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diazepam 1000 ukWord of Thru My Eyes continues to spread. A story on Thru My Eyes was published in The Free Lance-Star in Fredericksburg VA this week. Most importantly, this published article directly led to new referral from a family living in Virginia. One of the parents wanted to create a free video legacy as they fight advanced stage cancer. We are happy to help!   carisoprodol 350 mg side effects

Founder and President Carri Rubinstein has been featured as the March 2015 Hudson Valley Hero in Hudson Valley Magazine.

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The Chicago Tribune published a feature article about the work that we do focusing on one of our clients, Barbara.  I had the honor of spending a few hours with Barbara creating her video legacy.  I am so thankful that she reached out to us when she did.  As you will learn reading the article Barbara lost her battle just six weeks after we recorded with her.  

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 There were tears when Barbara Bardak’s three young children first started watching the video she’d made for them about her life and what she wanted for theirs. It wasn’t long, though, before they were nudging and kidding each other in affection for the mother they’d lost to breast cancer five months earlier at age 43.

“It was such a beautiful moment,” said Nora Bardak, Barbara’s mother-in-law and caregiver for the children — 10, 11 and 14 — in Rocky Point, N.Y. “What a gift this was, and it couldn’t have been easy for her — she had to think, ‘maybe I’m dying,'” even though she looked healthy on the tape made six weeks before she died in July.

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If you have not had the chance to watch the testimonial that Barbara gave us the day we recorded with her really illustrates some of the most powerful reasons to make a video legacy.

We have been featured in the 2014 winter issue of Cancer Today magazine. This magazine is in every cancer hospital across this country.

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Associated Press writer Jim Fitzgerald interviewed our President, Carri Rubinstein, this article has been picked up nationwide!

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We were featured on WNBC TV in New York.  Veteran journalist Pat Battle came along with us while recording with one of our clients.  Here is the segment than aired here in the NYC area.

Check out this great article excerpted from the Wall Street Journal reviewing the work we’ve done in the field of legacy videos and the impact it has on the individuals who participate:

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A Mother’s Last Gift to Her Children May Be a Legacy Video: Thru My Eyes is a Nonprofit That Creates Legacy Videos at No Cost to Patients

By Jeanne Whalen on Feb. 3, 2014 6:51 p.m. ET

The day Michelle Wallace gave birth to her fourth child, her doctors discovered she was suffering from an advanced case of endometrial cancer.

Ms. Wallace worried she was going to die before her newborn son, Toby, grew up. “Her biggest fear was that he was not going to remember her,” says Kallie Greenly, Ms. Wallace’s adult daughter. So before she died in 2011 at age 43, Ms. Wallace recorded a 17-minute video for her son, talking about her life, her idea of happiness and how she wanted to be remembered.

It is a step more terminally ill patients are taking these days, either on their own or with the help of a nonprofit group specializing in what are called “legacy videos.” Thru My Eyes records videos free in patients’ homes.

“I think there’s a sense of relief” for patients who make the videos, says Danielle Gagner, a physician assistant at White Plains Hospital in New York who helps guide breast-cancer patients through treatment. “I think they feel they’ve left something for their family members, so they’re at peace with that.”

Diana Nash, a bereavement counselor in New York City, says the videos can give children and other relatives a lasting memento of a loved one. Still, she says, “sometimes it’s hard for family members to see a video in the first couple of months after a person has died, because it’s just too soon. They’re still in shock, they’re still numb.” Legacy videos also can sometimes contain painful messages, overbearing advice or wishes that the children don’t feel they can carry out.

Research has shown that improvements in mental health and general well-being can result when people have the chance to tell their stories. In numerous studies, subjects who completed a daily writing exercise reported feeling more positive and less anxious, sleeping better and visiting the doctor less often, according to James Pennebaker, chairman of the psychology department at the University of Texas, Austin. There has been less research on the effects of videotaped expression, he says.

Ms. Wallace decided to make her video on the spur of the moment, says Ms. Greenly, 25, of Refugio, Texas, who appears with her mother in the video.

In the video, a teary-eyed Ms. Greenly asks her mother about happiness, her faults and strengths, her heroes and even her favorite curse word. Asked what she would like people to remember her for, Ms. Wallace tears up, too. “How much I love my family,” she says. “I know if I die before Toby is old enough to remember me, that’s the one thing I would want everybody to share, is just how much I love my family.”

Ms. Wallace died seven months later, when Toby was 2. She never watched the video but was relieved to have made it and put it in a keepsake box for Toby, her daughter says. Toby, now 5, recently watched the video, according to his father, Glen Bullock.

He says Toby recognized his mother but isn’t sure what other impact it had on him, as Toby is still young. “He was just like, that’s my mom!” says Ms. Greenly. “I know that as he gets older it’ll be more important to him, more special.”

Thru My Eyes, in Scarsdale, N.Y. operates mainly in the Northeast but also has helped people make legacy videos elsewhere in the country. Thru My Eyes relies on donations and grants and offers their services at no charge to patients.

Some hospitals tell patients about the video opportunity when their diagnosis reaches an advanced stage. Health-care professionals say the topic must be raised carefully. “It is very delicate.…I have to establish trust with patients to broach this,” says Eileen Heller, a social worker at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. “Almost always the patients are emotional about it because they’re directly confronting the fact they won’t be alive to raise their children.”

Ms. Heller refers willing patients to Thru My Eyes, founded in 2010 by Carri Rubinstein, a 22-year breast-cancer survivor. Ms. Rubinstein says she got the idea after meeting a cancer patient at her gym who wanted to make a video for her child.

With grants from donors including the Countess Moira Charitable Foundation, based in Pelham, N.Y., Thru My Eyes has made some 40 videos so far in patients’ homes.

Sometimes the group lends families video cameras so they can capture meals, bath time and other everyday rituals for the video.

Sometimes Ms. Rubinstein interviews patients on tape. Other times family members or a psychiatrist volunteers with Thru My Eyes. One patient who was too frail to get up from her hospital bed spoke for 2½ hours, though her family thought she couldn’t go for more than 15 minutes, Ms. Rubinstein said.

Not every patient making a video has young children. Natalie Corbo recorded a video with Thru My Eyes before she died of breast cancer in 2012, when her children were in their 30s. Her daughter, Faith Corbo, now 34, watched the DVD about three months after her mother passed away. She says it is “one of the best gifts” she has ever received.

THRU MY EYES Press Release- January 2014

CREATING A GIFT OF A ‘LIVING’ LEGACY FOR LOVED ONES Thru My Eyes Facilitates Free Videography for the Terminally Ill

When faced with a life-threatening illness, what messages would one want to leave for future generations to share and remember them by?  How would one begin to construct these messages and present them in a way that would be viewed as a source of comfort, love and guidance for surviving family members, as well as for future generations?

Thru My Eyes is a non-profit organization offering free “living” legacies for the families and loved ones of people with life-threatening illnesses.  Professional videographers and trained counselors are made available at no cost to help guide those who are chronically ill through what might be a very challenging task in presenting a gift of lasting messages to their children and other family members.  The organization was founded with the sole purpose of empowering those with life-threatening diseases with the peace and knowledge in knowing that they will be remembered by those whom they loved the most. It is a coping mechanism that helps people who are chronically ill know that they have said all that needs to be said, and therefore, may be remembered and heard for generations to come. Basically what Thru My Eyes provides is the gift of a lasting memory to share in perpetuity.

The process is simple, and once Thru My Eyes is contacted, a counselor will conduct the initial intake and clinically-guided questions will be prepared to help navigate the communication process.  A videotaping session with a professional videographer and the counselor will be scheduled and usually takes place in the comfort of one’s own home. The session will last between 1-½ to 2 hours and is based on the pre-determined goals of the individual with a customized list of questions.  Within a month the videotape will be completely edited, finalized and delivered on a DVD.

According to Thru My Eyes Co-Founder and President Carri Rubinstein, “We make the videotaping process as simple as possible for the individual and family members, sometimes basing the questions around conversations that may be held at the kitchen table. For a parent of very young children, we suggest videotaping basic everyday tasks such as meal times, story readings and bath times, to leave the child with a sense of what the relationship was like with his or her parent.”

Thru My Eyes was founded in honor of Deirdre “Dede” Dorsy Frontera, who passed away in May 2010. When faced with the news that her breast cancer had metastasized throughout her body, Dede, at age 40, felt that she had many things to say to her young daughter. She wanted to offer motherly advice and provide memories that were appropriate for her then 8-year old daughter.

“The challenge is in getting each person to feel completely comfortable throughout the videotaping process and that is why we provide clinically-guided messages with the help of a professional therapist,” adds Debby Ziering, Thru My Eyes Vice President. “It provides the comfort in knowing that they will be heard when the time is right by those they love the most.”

Thru My Eyes operates in the Northeast corridor of the U.S.  However, through technology, videotaping may be conducted virtually anywhere.  In addition, bi-lingual counselors are available for Spanish speaking families. For more information pertaining to creating a living legacy, contact Thru My Eyes by calling 914-725-1836, emailing info@thrumyeyes.org, or logging on to best place to buy soma.  All information obtained is held in the strictest confidence.

Media Contact: Cathy Callegari – 917-968-7706 or buy carisoprodol fedex

 

Carri Rubinstein explains that making a video legacy for your children and loved ones does not mean that you are giving up the battle against your disease. You are simply taking out an insurance policy and hopefully 10 years from now, you and your family can sit and watch it together.

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Article in Scarsdale Inquirer (Please click on article to read the full article) Please note the article incorrectly states that we are a 401c3. We are a 501(c)3 not for profit organization.

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Sean Adams of WCBS news 88O interviewed Carri Rubinstein, Michelle Maidenberg, Debby Ziering, and Ralph Corbo about Thru My Eyes   which aired Monday June 2 2013. Please scroll to the middle of the article where you will find an arrow to be able to listen live. The red arrow at the top of the page does not work.

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Check out this great article excerpted from the Wall Street Journal reviewing the work we’ve done in the field of legacy videos and the impact it has on the individuals who participate:

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A Mother’s Last Gift to Her Children May Be a Legacy Video: Thru My Eyes is a Nonprofit That Creates Legacy Videos at No Cost to Patients

By Jeanne Whalen on Feb. 3, 2014 6:51 p.m. ET

 

 

The day Michelle Wallace gave birth to her fourth child, her doctors discovered she was suffering from an advanced case of endometrial cancer.

Ms. Wallace worried she was going to die before her newborn son, Toby, grew up. “Her biggest fear was that he was not going to remember her,” says Kallie Greenly, Ms. Wallace’s adult daughter. So before she died in 2011 at age 43, Ms. Wallace recorded a 17-minute video for her son, talking about her life, her idea of happiness and how she wanted to be remembered.

It is a step more terminally ill patients are taking these days, either on their own or with the help of a nonprofit group specializing in what are called “legacy videos.” Thru My Eyes records videos free in patients’ homes.

“I think there’s a sense of relief” for patients who make the videos, says Danielle Gagner, a physician assistant at White Plains Hospital in New York who helps guide breast-cancer patients through treatment. “I think they feel they’ve left something for their family members, so they’re at peace with that.”

Diana Nash, a bereavement counselor in New York City, says the videos can give children and other relatives a lasting memento of a loved one. Still, she says, “sometimes it’s hard for family members to see a video in the first couple of months after a person has died, because it’s just too soon. They’re still in shock, they’re still numb.” Legacy videos also can sometimes contain painful messages, overbearing advice or wishes that the children don’t feel they can carry out.

Research has shown that improvements in mental health and general well-being can result when people have the chance to tell their stories. In numerous studies, subjects who completed a daily writing exercise reported feeling more positive and less anxious, sleeping better and visiting the doctor less often, according to James Pennebaker, chairman of the psychology department at the University of Texas, Austin. There has been less research on the effects of videotaped expression, he says.

Ms. Wallace decided to make her video on the spur of the moment, says Ms. Greenly, 25, of Refugio, Texas, who appears with her mother in the video.

In the video, a teary-eyed Ms. Greenly asks her mother about happiness, her faults and strengths, her heroes and even her favorite curse word. Asked what she would like people to remember her for, Ms. Wallace tears up, too. “How much I love my family,” she says. “I know if I die before Toby is old enough to remember me, that’s the one thing I would want everybody to share, is just how much I love my family.”

Ms. Wallace died seven months later, when Toby was 2. She never watched the video but was relieved to have made it and put it in a keepsake box for Toby, her daughter says. Toby, now 5, recently watched the video, according to his father, Glen Bullock.

He says Toby recognized his mother but isn’t sure what other impact it had on him, as Toby is still young. “He was just like, that’s my mom!” says Ms. Greenly. “I know that as he gets older it’ll be more important to him, more special.”

Thru My Eyes, in Scarsdale, N.Y. operates mainly in the Northeast but also has helped people make legacy videos elsewhere in the country. Thru My Eyes relies on donations and grants and offers their services at no charge to patients.

Some hospitals tell patients about the video opportunity when their diagnosis reaches an advanced stage. Health-care professionals say the topic must be raised carefully. “It is very delicate.…I have to establish trust with patients to broach this,” says Eileen Heller, a social worker at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. “Almost always the patients are emotional about it because they’re directly confronting the fact they won’t be alive to raise their children.”

Ms. Heller refers willing patients to Thru My Eyes, founded in 2010 by Carri Rubinstein, a 22-year breast-cancer survivor. Ms. Rubinstein says she got the idea after meeting a cancer patient at her gym who wanted to make a video for her child.

With grants from donors including the Countess Moira Charitable Foundation, based in Pelham, N.Y., Thru My Eyes has made some 40 videos so far in patients’ homes.

Sometimes the group lends families video cameras so they can capture meals, bath time and other everyday rituals for the video.

Sometimes Ms. Rubinstein interviews patients on tape. Other times family members or a psychiatrist volunteers with Thru My Eyes. One patient who was too frail to get up from her hospital bed spoke for 2½ hours, though her family thought she couldn’t go for more than 15 minutes, Ms. Rubinstein said.

Not every patient making a video has young children. Natalie Corbo recorded a video with Thru My Eyes before she died of breast cancer in 2012, when her children were in their 30s. Her daughter, Faith Corbo, now 34, watched the DVD about three months after her mother passed away. She says it is “one of the best gifts” she has ever received.

Ms. Corbo says she was struggling in her marriage at the time her mother made the video. “She, in a very diplomatic way, commented on my husband maybe not being the best choice for me, but that we were working very hard and she supported me in all my endeavors,” Ms. Corbo says. She ended up getting a divorce before her mother died.

Ralph Corbo, Faith’s father, says he has watched the video of his late wife twice. “You do put yourself through it again and of course you’re looking at your lover and loved one and listening to her voice,” he says of the experience. “It is real, which is different from a photograph.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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